What’s The Best Crowdfunding Agency To Work With?

Let’s be honest here. Working with a crowdfunding agency is not for everyone.

However, if you want to and have saved enough dough to work with a crowdfunding agency, it can provide a positive ROI for your campaign (head to Google for some of the most well-known ones out there).

There are SO MANY MORE agencies out there and they all have their specialties and niches.

Know that when you’re signing up to work with an agency, you’re buying into a lot of things.

You’re buying into their industry knowledge, you’re buying into their systems, you’re buying into their platforms, and you’re buying into their connections.

At this point, if you’re about ready to engage with a crowdfunding agency, I’m sure they’ve sent over information about their successful campaigns, generic steps they’ll take to bring your project to life and glowing testimonials.

After having worked at a crowdfunding agency myself, there are three critical things I’d look for as a potential customer:

What kind of projects they are currently working with.

The agency will not be able to give you specific names, but should be able to provide general industry verticals and a loose budget.

Why is this important?

It determines how much time they’ll be spending on YOU. Think of it this way. If the agency is partnered with another project that is within their niche specialty or one that has a large working budget, they’ll probably be spending most of their resources on the other project.

You want to make sure that you’re working with an agency that will put effort into your project.

What communication will be like throughout the working relationship. 

Some companies treat creators like partners. Here, things are researched, recommended and then discussed.

On the other hand, others take a more “dictatorial” approach. With these agencies, it’s “their way or the highway”.

You probably can figure out what communication is like between the two extremes.

There are crowdfunding companies that are on each side and all along the spectrum.

As a creator, determine what you’re comfortable with. Be sure to ask probing questions about this.

What the agency does when projects they’re working with do not meet the ideal goals initially set out.

It’s what agencies do in times of “crisis” that really matters.

Some agencies collect their retainer (or their upfront fee) and leave you high and dry if your project doesn’t take off as planned. It’s really in their best interest to do so since putting resources into a dying project typically does not make the best business sense.

However, the truly classy agencies will stand by their client and do what needs to be done.

Maybe it’s revisiting the marketing channels after collecting preliminary data. Maybe it’s revisiting the type of creative to better work with the audience. Maybe it’s revisiting the positioning of the project itself to become more relevant.

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At this point, agencies would have already sent over things that put them in the best possible light.

Once that’s done, these are the main three questions I’d want answered.

Also, when you’re vetting different agencies also make sure they’re on-time, prepared for meetings and generally seem trustworthy.

You can usually tell a lot about how working with an agency will be during the preliminary stages of conversation.

If you want to work with an agency, but you’re not sure which one would be the best fit. I’d be happy to help you out! Find me in the Fully Funded Facebook group and let’s go over your project!

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